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that the united states helped to liberate from the dictator moammar gadhafi and a mob attacked the embassy in cairo, egypt, yesterday. climbing the embassy walls. tearing down and ripping apart the united states flag. it's unclear if the attacks were koord natded or plans to con side with the 11th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks here in america. but moments ago, our president obama spoke out about these killings. >> the united states condemns in the strongest terms this outrageous and shocking attack. we're working with the government of libya to secure our diplomats. i've always directed my administration to increase our security at diplomatic posts around the world and make no mistake. we will work with the libyan government to bring to justice the killers who attacked our people. >> we're covering this story from as many angles that cnn has all over the world and beginning in tripoli, the site of the killings. our correspondent is live for us. just tell me right now what the circumstance there is. is there still violence in the streets? has the government cracked down? what's happening
moammar gadhafi was still alive, when he was still the dictator of libya, gadhafi had a plan to settle the conflict between israel and the palestinians. to settle that issue once and for all in a very simple way, all you had to do, he said, was make a new place. a new place that would be called isratine. so it was like israel and palestine but you combined them so it would be isratine. he thought just calling a new place that would settle everything. moammar gadhafi also had a condoleezza price problem in he loved condoleezza rice too much. when his compound in tripoli was overrun by rebel forces one thing he found in his living quarters was a mash book of pictures and clippings about condoleezza rice. every page a new thing about condoleezza rice. eke. gadhafi it turns out was also afraid of the top floors of buildings that had multiple floors. ga dauf dhafi also never liked to go anywhere without a ukrainian nurse. he had a whole fleet of ukrainian nurses. there was one familiar blond one he liked with him at all times. gadhafi's son once booked mariah carey to perform for the gadhaf
misadventures. he once in libya was followed by one of moammar gadhafi's intelligence agents and he snatched the camera away from the libyan goon and turned and and snapped the guy's picture with it and then he smiled and gave the camera back but he made his point. once when he was based in jerusalem, he was in the middle of the second intifada and a time of real tensions when palestinians were blowing themselves enough israeli bus stations and he and a colleague went out in the middle of a rare snowstorm in jerusalem and started lobbing snowballs at each other and the israelis and palestinians on both sides of the divide got involved and it was a moment that broke what was one of the tensest times in relations. >> very sad day. do you think there were some warning signals missed that could have prevented what happened in benghazi? >> the united states issued a >> the united states issued a travel warning just last month talking about the increase in political violence, assassinations, car bombings, warned that the wide array of militias could begin engaging with each other at any time, at a
to libyan people and relieving them of the nightmare of muammar gadhafi, and if you look at the public opinion polls, the libyan people are not as a whole anti-american. this is just unfortunately an aspect of -- as secretary clinton put it. sometimes the confounding neigh nature of how we relate to the rest of the world and our experience this n that world, but it doesn't mean that the united states should retreat and go home. it does mean that we have to stay during the hard work, our diplomats especially, the hard work of protecting this country overseas. >> nick, do you think we have the united states has a lot of cache in libya considering the secretary says this is a fringe group, this is a small minority here, these are not the people that the united states tried to help liberate? >> well, i do think the united states has considerable influence there, and it was interesting, suzanne, to remember that in the recent libyan elections of just a few months ago, there was a surprising result. the extremists did not win. the moderates won, and they are ruling the government of libya to
insurgency by the libyan islamic fighting group against the gadhafi regime during the 1990s. the militancy is we are seeing right now in libya by groups by the sharia indicated in the attacks, i'm on to argue this is really a symptom of a fracturing of the salafi movement in libya. after the revolution what you saw is many of the former libyan islamic fighting group's, people like abdul akim and the brother of -- were veterans of the struggle against gadhafi and enter politics and ran as parliamentary candidates. there was a faction however that resisted integration and formed militias that have called for boycotting the elections and that is really trying to make their voice heard in libya. as i have argued in some articles this faction has really failed to get traction or to gain resonance in libyan society. they been obviously making a lot of noise about the elections in certain places like the serna and benghazi they have been trying to implement social mores and playing the arab-israeli card calling for support in gaza and sending volunteers to syria. most recently saw them attacking
gay day. the secretary of state said he lost his life trying -- gadhafi. the secretary of state said he lost his life trying to build a better libya. >> this was an attack against shale and savage a -- against a small and savage group. >> reporter: he was an analyst who would joke with condoleezza rice about gadhafi's crush on her, an ambassador who would brew up a cappachino for senator john mccain. >> he's just a good california dude. >> reporter: matthew van dyke, the baltimore man who fought for the rebels in benghazi, says the vast majority of libyans love america for helping them win their freedom. >> people are really upset. they're really ashamed. shame is a big thing in islamic culture and they feel it deeply. >> reporter: there is an old saying in american politics that in america politics somes at the water he is edge but innocent in case. republican presidential nominee mitt romney blasted a statement out of the american embassy in cairo that criticized that anti- islam video. he said that the statement from the embassy was akin to appeasement and that led to a pretty
phases. two years under moammar gadhafi, then the liaison ambassador. >> and he worked hard to get rid of gadhafi through these rebels? >> absolutely. and he has reached out and he really knows the streets. the libyan people. in the same way he's known in every place i've ever known him, he has been one who has really been engaged. when he looks for what role the united states should play, listens to what the people on the ground are saying, not just -- >> and he was fluent in arabic, a career diplomat, spent 20 years in the foreign service and you knew him, so this is important. what would he want the united states to do towards libya in the aftermath of what has happened, this tragic killing of him and three of his colleagues? >> i think he'd say do not waiver, that the united states was on a course to try to help facilitate a very traumatic transition in many of these countries. he was doing things in trying to help establish the rule of law. helping disarm the militias, promoting the kind of development or access to technology and know-how so libya could build what is potentially a
of the availability of weapons to various groups there since the resolution began and ended with the death of gadhafi and the handover of power to new government. what happened in libya is absolutely outrageous and i'm hearing from many libyan who is are very saddened by the death of the u.s. ambassador and embassy staff and say this is not what our resolution was about. in fact, this is worse, this is an insult to the resolution and an insult to the very topic of islam that people are trying to defend here. >> a distinction that extremists don't make, mona, right? >> reporter: no, absolutely. what the exteamists extremists plan to do is they speak for millions of muslims around the world. they do not speak for the majority of egyptians and libyans. i cannot emphasize enough to the viewers that the people responsible for the attack in libya and the people responsible for the protest in egypt belong to a fringe minority on the right wing who do not represent the majority of people in egypt and libya. >> stick with us, mona, this is still developing. we want you to give us your perspective, but we are
force to get rid of moammar gadhafi, to help libya stand up as it moved towards elections, as it tries to start anew. i think there's going to be a lot of gut checking right now about how the u.s. wants to proceed. not just with libya. but with a lot of countries in the middle east. i mean if you look at the islamic wave that has swept the middle east in terms of these revolutions, the u.s. was very apprehensive, that we are going to support democratic movements. but they also said, secretary clinton has also said that an election does not a democracy make. and so these countries are not going to necessarily hold up to their end of the bargain. there are diplomatic conventions about protecting u.s. facilities. about holding to democratic values. and you saw some statements coming out of the libyan interior ministry right now blaming the united states, in fact, for something like this. i think thers going to be a lot of, you know, the u.s. is really going to hunker down and think about how they want to proceed now. not just in libya but in the whole region. >> elise, this is brooke. let
. there's abundant weaponry. that's all been stolen from gadhafi's arsenals during the revolution. there is in security services. so, when we talk about preplanned, we have to decide whether it was something that had been planned months in advance, weeks in advance or something that was hastily put together, a couple of cell phone calls half an hour before. they knew ambassador stevens was there and seized the moment. so it may have been planned, but 30 minutes beforehand. >> and of course we get into the whole question of immediate aftermath. when did u.s. intelligence now, when did they tell the white house, which is going to become a crucial issue, who is to blame for any errors that may have happened. from your reporting and you've done a lot in terms of studying these jihadist and extremist groups, what i find incredibly ironic here is that these groups linked to al-qaeda wanted moammar gadhafi to be killed. that was something that was accomplished by the united states, who are they are now trying to attack. >> that's right. they don't care who does their work for them so lon
the effort to liberate them from muammar gadhafi. so we're still trying to piece through all the conflicting bits of information, but the latest information from u.s. intelligence suggesting that this was preplanned, at least the one in libya also suggests that the united states and others have been noticing an uptick of al qaeda activity in that area. also in iraq for that matter. particularly in the benghazi area, which hasn't fully yet come under control of the central libyan government. libyan government leaders were very, very quick to condemn what happened, the killing, the death of ambassador stevens, and the other three american diplomats. called it cowardly and criminal, and said that they would be hunted down. as you know, the united states has said, president, secretary of state, that these killers will be brought to justice. very important to know that this is not a sort of anti-americanism all over libya that's at work. it's a small group of militants and extremists. the same thing happened apparently in egypt. >> explain to us because this was a big question that we had earlier
of thousands of people who were taking up arms against gadhafi. they have -- as the reporter in libya indicated, being able to do some attacks on western targets. my guess is they're going to come under extreme pressure right now. >> peter, i want to show our audience really the pattern here of what we have seen in the past here. we are talking about protests breaking out and we've seen the same kind of reaction from some of these incidents that have offended muslims. back in 1998 there was a fatwa issued for writing satanic verses. in 2005, korans being desecrated at guantanamo bay. also cartoonists getting death threats after a controversial cartoon and 2011 riots after pasto pastor terry jones burned a koran. and then protests after korans used by taliban prisoners. there seems to be no room for interpretation. why are we seeing the kind of violent response and violent reaction to these incidents? explain that to us. >> reporter: well, i have a piece which just came out on cnn.com which examines this history a little bit. one point that i think is important is that extremists on both sides h
at the american consulate in benghazi. just ahead, we'll have a closer look at libya since the fall of the gadhafi regime. [ acoustic guitar: upbeat ] [ dog ] we found it together. on a walk, walk, walk. love to walk. yeah, we found that wonderful thing. and you smiled. and threw it. and i decided i would never, ever leave it anywhere. because that wonderful, bouncy, roll-around thing... had made you play. and that... had made you smile. [ announcer ] beneful. play. it's good for you. after you jumped buship in bangkok,n. i thought i'd lost you. >>> surfing is my life now. but who's going to .... >>> tell the world that priceline has even faster, easier ways to save you money. . . on hotels, flights & cars? you still have it. >>> i'll always have it. so this is it? >>> we'll see where the waves take me. sayonara, brah! i've been fortunate to win on golf's biggest stages. but when joint pain and stiffness from psoriatic arthritis hit, even the smallest things became difficult. i finally understood what serious joint pain is like. i talked to my rheumatologist and he prescribed enbrel. enbrel ca
of a gadhafi regime, islamic extremists. there have been power outages in every town in the country since the revolution has had some degree of fighting and where the militias have refused to give up their arms. it has been an extraordinarily trying time for the government to take control over the country. >> eliot: not to parse this, the government we recognize nobody suggests that government had any role in instigating this. >> absolutely not. >> eliot: these are rogue elements but are not affiliated the government. >> thank god. what happened in libya was that there was an election of a pro western, secular nonislammics, nonbrotherhood government. while there's disagreements between east and west, the east wanted to break away and form their own federal separate sort of transnational state. that's been part of what's been going on here as well. the government in tripoli is pro -- >> if i could add one thing. political development in libya has been a really positive thing. the whole of the militias has been a disastr
, tribal conflict and supporters of former president gadhafi. from the carnegie endowment for international peace, this is nearly two hours. a. >> good afternoon welcome to the carnegie endowment. i am a senior associate in the program here, and i am very happy that we were able to bring you a group of very knowledgeable speakers about the situation in libya. as we all all know libya has vey much been in the headlines in the last few days, but not necessarily in a positive fashion. the news reports coming out of libya is a very confusing situation. on the other hand the government that seems to have little control on what is going on in the country to the point where they could not prevent an attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. at the same time government that is extremely anxious to cooperate with the united states, extremely interested to behave the way of government should do in a situation of this sort. in addition, we see something that we very rarely see to take a position in favor of all government control. they are trying to -- the militias and the problem of the militias. we
compound. in libya moammar gadhafi's gone. the u.s. ambassador and three other people are dead because some terrorists in that country didn't like a movie critical of islam. syria's become a slaughter house murdering the civilian population at will. iran continues the march toward nuclear weapons. i don't want to even think what might happen if they get them. and al qaeda is busy reconstitutes itself in pakistan and half a dozen other countries. the song writer who wrote the phrase, wishing won't make it so, spot-on. and anybody who thinks the middle east is suddenly going to transform itself into a peaceful civilization where majority rules, they just haven't been reading the history books. here's the question, is the arab spring worth it? go to cnn.com/caffertyfile, post a comment on my blog. or go to our post on the "the situation room" facebook page. >> you heard mitt romney today express concern that arab spring was turning out to be an arab winter. jack, a good question. >> i think mr. romney may have done himself a lot of damage today. >> we're going to have much more on this part of
.s. was trying to restore its ties with the regime of gadhafi. and he was the head diplomat on the ground there. and then after the fall of gadhafi, he was sent as the envoy to the opposition. on the ground in benghazi with the rebels. that's where he was really the most happy, just trying to get this country working with this new government to be ready for the day after. and then after moammar gadhafi fell, he was really considered the only man for the job. he had such an affinity for libya. fluent arab speaker, really considered by everybody as one of the top diplomats of the state department. everyone speaking to friends and colleagues, really mourning his loss today. >> he wasn't on the job for very long, was he? >> he wasn't on the job as u.s. ambassador for very long. several months ago i attended his swearing in and secretary clinton swore him in. he has been working on libya for the the past five years, as i said, first as that envoy to the moammar gadhafi regime and then as the envoy to the transitional national council. really libya always in his heart. i remember before he left a lot
the regime of moammar gadhafi. they welcomed the support of nato air strikes, but said they did not want to see any boots on the ground. so at this point, this could be a real controversial issue here in libya. we have to wait and hear, see what the libyan government officials say about this. they have said they're unable to deal with groups. >> and that, nick kristof, let me bring you in here. some people had told her tonight, regular libyans, they don't want americans in the military and want to turn libya into the next iraq. >> but i do think libya is profoundly different in that respect. there's a rell current of anti-americ anti-americanism in egypt. there is clearly a sense of deep mourning. they want americans to take action against the killers, but i think the government is really going to go after them. it's going to do what it can and there is you know, libya may well be the most pro american country in the region in a way that is not true and i'm the little skeptical about what american warships are going to be able to do in that kind of context. >> i don't want to put words i
gadhafi and killed in a city, benghazi, that he helped to save. i understand that there are 200 marines being sent to libya. what do we know about the tk orders? >> 200 marines who are already in the region, they are aboard one of those flat-top helicopter carriers in the iranian sea. they are called amphibious ready groups, and they are called f.a.s.t. teams prepositioned in all parts of the world, but particularly the hot middle east region as we see here. it should not take long to get those 200 marines who will be particularly equipped for the mission there in tripoli. this is not some kind of military operation or a strike of any kind. they will be armed with small arms and anti-riot gear and the like as opposed to going in for a military strike or operation. now in addition to that preparations are under way, too, to send additional f.a.s.t. teams, maybe not in the same numbers, but one to cairo and one to kabul. we know from past experience there has been violent and deadly sectarian flare ups against americans in kabul over some of the actions of american troops there that were
there. the population since gadhafi fell is armed with sophisticated arms. there's multiple groups there. they have been attacking foreigners before this, not this organized, international committees of the red cross they've attacked a couple of times. the government cannot get these arms back. how big the militant groups are, this al qaeda franchise in libya, nobody knows. who's the center of it, nobody knows. it could be internet driven. for the libyan government to retake libya, you know, in an organized way and disarm the population is not going to happen any time soon. drones are not going to help in the situation. it takes too long to gear these things up. the best we can do is since the libyan government cannot protect our embassy there or our consulate is that we have to send marines in to do that or close our embassy. there's no in between. you really do need the cooperation of a government. i was in tehran shortly before the embassy was overrun there. and, frankly, anderson, i'm seeing the same sort of sentiment in the middle east in the arab world as we saw in tehran in '78 an
.s. dollars with warships off the coast of libya attacking the moammar gadhafi regime for the purposes of transitioning libya without a stated policy or defined policy of who we were supporting, what we hoped to gain, the gio political view of those who might come to power and now the president continues to operate in an area where he has no articulated policy. now four americans are dead, our ambassador is debt and the president is yet to be able to describe what has occurred and what is the president's policy? why is it the president is operating a year after having attacked libya without a policy. >> congressman, to be fair, and support of the president and policy will point out that time was of the essence given moammar gadhafi's intention to go house to house and kill them like rats or words to that effect. you and senator jim demint have requested any diplomatic cables that might have come from ambassador chris stevens. what are you hoping to learn, senator, from those cables? >> first of all, it was myself and the senator from tennessee. >> sorry. the question was to you since y
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 438 (some duplicates have been removed)